Walk Report: Central Fells Day 1

 

Date: 20th Oct 2007
Stats: 15.0 miles, 3300 feet
Weather: Bright and sunny, windy on the tops, wet underfoot but no rain
Trig Points: 1: TP3807 – High Seat
Fells: 7: Walla Crag, Bleaberry Fell, High Seat, High Tove, Ullscarf, Sergeant’s Crag, Eagle Crag
Other Info: Extensive, but expensive parking options in Keswick
Summary: Keswick, Walla Crag, Bleaberry Fell, High Seat, The Pewits, High Tove, Long Moss, Standing Crag, Ullscarf, Greenup Edge, Long Scar, Sergeant’s Crag, Eagle Crag, Greenup Gill, Stonethwaite

Key to symbols:
= Trig Point     = Wainwright

Had a boys weekend away with Rob, walking from Keswick to Stonethwaite, along the spine of the central fells, and then back to Stonethwaite via one of the prettiest valleys in the Lakes. Saturday was a combination of bright sunshine, low on the horizon and in the eyes all day and light mist, meaning that most of my pictures came out rubbish.

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Car park in Keswick. I’d decided to go with the Inov-8 trail shoes this weekend. Firstly because I wanted to see how comfortable they were over a longer walk and also because I expected it to be wet and boggy on the tops and if I was going to end up with wet feet, I may as well have light weight footwear instead of my usual boots.

Keswick and Stonethwaite
This is Catbells through the morning mist, a beautiful russet colour

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Derwent Water and Cat Bells from the path up to Walla Crag

Keswick and Stonethwaite
The rough and rocky summit of Walla Crag, looking back towards Keswick and the hills behind

Keswick and Stonethwaite

Keswick and Stonethwaite
The only shots that came out well today were short range retrospectives, this one looking back over the marshy ground to Bleaberry Fell, from the approach to High Seat

Keswick and Stonethwaite
High Seat trig point – Walking from Keswick to Stonethwaite is possibly the most consistently boggy walk I’ve ever done. Weather was superb however, so only the bottom 12-18 inches got wet and muddy 🙂 Fine stone built trig with superb views across dozens of fells

Keswick and Stonethwaite
At the bottom of High Seat we had to pass through The Pewits, some of the boggiest ground I have ever had to cross – its only a short distance, but we zigged and zagged across it so much, we must have walked 3 times further than we needed

Keswick and Stonethwaite
The results of bog hopping through The Pewits. It was a cracking day though and it was only the bottom 12 to 18 inches that actually suffered. I can imagine this must be a bloody awful place to walk if the weather was bad. I don’t think I’ll be rushing back to do these peaks again

Keswick and Stonethwaite

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Blea Tarn, from the slopes of Standing Crag. Although it looks a bit bleak there is some great walking to be had up here, the path alongside Blea Tarn down to Watendlath didn’t look too bad

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Me and Rob on the summit of Ullscarf

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Eagle Crag guards the entrance to the Borrowdale valley

Keswick and Stonethwaite
After crossing Ullscarf and dropping down to Greenup Edge, we still had plenty of daylight left and plenty of energy, so we swung around Greenup Edge to Sergeant’s Crag and Eagle Crag. This pictures shows the moraines that cover the ground all the way down to Greenup Gill

Keswick and Stonethwaite
We startled a Red Deer stag, who loped off across the fells before us – a majestic site and made our day

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Rob strides out towards Sergeant’s Crag

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Sergeant’s Crag approaches – this is truly remarkable weather for late October – we’re very lucky!

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Langstrath from Sergeant’s Crag. The walls running up the opposite fellside were absolutely awesone. Arrow straight almost vertical walls running hundreds of yards up the hill – what an achievement!

Keswick and Stonethwaite
Two walkers ahead of us on the path down into Borrowdale – we’ve just spent a nerve racking 10 minutes descending th
e steep face of Eagle Crag. This is definitely the face to ascend rather than the way we did it.

Keswick and Stonethwaite
We tried to come down the front face of Eagle Crag (seen here), but couldn’t find the path easily, so chose discretion over valour and took a slightly grassier, but no less steep route down beneath Pounsey Crag. A great end to the day.

lonewalker

Fell-walker, trig-pointer, peak-bagger, Wainwright-er & Pennine Way author, with a passion for long paths, malt whisky, fast cars & Man City

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