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Over the past few years, as I’ve looked for inspiration in my weekend walks, I’ve used little projects to bring together walks that have a theme in common. This may be hills in a certain area, like the Howgills or the Bowland Fells, or they may centre around a specific hill, like Kinder Scout.

I’m hoping to use this page to bring together all the walks I’ve undertaken as part of these mini-projects and share them – perhaps as inspiration for others to get out there and explore our wonderful scenery.

Each of the sections below will take you to a main introduction page of each project. I hope you enjoy reading about them as much as I enjoyed walking them (well most of them anyway)!

If you enjoy quiet walks in the hills, away from the sort of crowds you get in the Lake District, but still want to achieve high and remote walks, then you should consider the Howgill Fells. These are the rolling green giants you see to your right as you speed along the M6, northwards between J37 and J38 – I’ve been admiring these hills for as long as I’ve been driving that motorway, which is almost 30 years. Originally it was disconnected admiration, just the respect of a beautiful landscape, often wreathed in cloud or dusted with snow, in their brown winter drab or their gorgeous green summer coats.

If you enjoy quiet walks in the hills, away from the sort of crowds you get in the Lake District, but still want to achieve high and remote walks, then you should consider the Howgill Fells. These are the rolling green giants you see to your right as you speed along the M6, northwards between J37 and J38 – I’ve been admiring these hills for as long as I’ve been driving that motorway, which is almost 30 years. Originally it was disconnected admiration, just the respect of a beautiful landscape, often wreathed in cloud or dusted with snow, in their brown winter drab or their gorgeous green summer coats.

If you enjoy quiet walks in the hills, away from the sort of crowds you get in the Lake District, but still want to achieve high and remote walks, then you should consider the Howgill Fells. These are the rolling green giants you see to your right as you speed along the M6, northwards between J37 and J38 – I’ve been admiring these hills for as long as I’ve been driving that motorway, which is almost 30 years. Originally it was disconnected admiration, just the respect of a beautiful landscape, often wreathed in cloud or dusted with snow, in their brown winter drab or their gorgeous green summer coats.

If you enjoy quiet walks in the hills, away from the sort of crowds you get in the Lake District, but still want to achieve high and remote walks, then you should consider the Howgill Fells. These are the rolling green giants you see to your right as you speed along the M6, northwards between J37 and J38 – I’ve been admiring these hills for as long as I’ve been driving that motorway, which is almost 30 years. Originally it was disconnected admiration, just the respect of a beautiful landscape, often wreathed in cloud or dusted with snow, in their brown winter drab or their gorgeous green summer coats.

If you enjoy quiet walks in the hills, away from the sort of crowds you get in the Lake District, but still want to achieve high and remote walks, then you should consider the Howgill Fells. These are the rolling green giants you see to your right as you speed along the M6, northwards between J37 and J38 – I’ve been admiring these hills for as long as I’ve been driving that motorway, which is almost 30 years. Originally it was disconnected admiration, just the respect of a beautiful landscape, often wreathed in cloud or dusted with snow, in their brown winter drab or their gorgeous green summer coats.

The “Wainwrights” are the Lake District mountains, hills, fells, crags and tops described by Alfred Wainwright in his Pictorial Guides to the Lakeland Fells. There are seven of these books, all reproduced in his own script with the fine line drawings that made him famous. The seven books contain 214 catalogued summits, classified by geographical location. I did my first Wainwright without even knowing it, when I climbed Coniston Old Man in July of 2005. I hadn’t even heard of Alfred Wainwright at that time and the Lakeland fells were a complete mystery to me.

At the back end of 2014 an article, publicised through Twitter, caught my eye – and it would seem, the eyes of many other walkers and backpackers. The article was from Alistair Humphreys and it discussed the idea of getting out into the hills, for at least one night every month in 2015. He calls them MicroAdventures and they can be anything you want them to be, but the idea is you get out and about, have a bit of fun and sleep outdoors. More details on Al’s site here: A Year of MicroAdventures